Essay Japanese Restaurant

Essay Japanese Restaurant-30
I also believe this is the reason the Japanese emphasize “naturalness” and “purity” in their culinary culture as well as in their traditional culture.The concept of “naturalness” and “purity” is an integral part of Japanese life.

I also believe this is the reason the Japanese emphasize “naturalness” and “purity” in their culinary culture as well as in their traditional culture.The concept of “naturalness” and “purity” is an integral part of Japanese life.

That is, the Japanese tend to appreciate the “naturalness” and “purity” of food so they try to eat food as fresh and pure as possible.

For example, people like to sample raw fish known as “sashimi” before they cook it. Rice, which is the Japanese staple food, is cooked, but it isn’t usually turned into other forms of food.

Sometimes, it is fine to just pop in to your local sushi shop for a few bites and a chat with an old friend.

Below are some photos of my recent dinner at An: a good, low-key sushiya in San Francisco's Japantown.

The price ranges from 800 yen to 1500 yen per lunch box.

As the Japanese have led their lives surrounded by relatively natural environments since ancient times, nature has been an object of worship and blessing, not an object of confrontation.

The ingredients of “washoku” include a variety of sashimi (raw fish), sushi, shellfish, variously cooked vegetables, miso soup, pickled vegetables, cooked rice, black beans, kelp, cooked eggs, mushrooms, tofu (bean curd), chicken and many others.

For seasoning, soy sauce is commonly used, and the basic broth for “washoku” is made from dried bonito and “konbu” kelp.

They still appreciate nature in traditional strolling gardens, by engaging in arranging flowers, or growing bonsai (potted dwarf tree).

They suffer from natural disasters caused by landslides, earthquakes and typhoons, but they also have benefited from nature in terms of food.

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