Health And Wellness Research Paper

Health And Wellness Research Paper-18
Workplace wellness programs have been touted as a powerful tool that can make employees healthier and more productive while reducing health care spending, but the results of a new Harvard study suggest such interventions yield unimpressive results in the short term.The analysis, the first peer-reviewed, large-scale, multisite randomized controlled trial of a workplace wellness program, shows that people who worked at sites offering the program exhibited notably higher rates of some healthy behaviors, but no significant differences in other behaviors compared to the control group.Past research has suggested workplace wellness programs might be a good investment.

Workplace wellness programs have been touted as a powerful tool that can make employees healthier and more productive while reducing health care spending, but the results of a new Harvard study suggest such interventions yield unimpressive results in the short term.The analysis, the first peer-reviewed, large-scale, multisite randomized controlled trial of a workplace wellness program, shows that people who worked at sites offering the program exhibited notably higher rates of some healthy behaviors, but no significant differences in other behaviors compared to the control group.Past research has suggested workplace wellness programs might be a good investment.

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The School has teamed up with two strategic partners (Remedy Health and Connect Well) to extend the reach of our vast library of health and wellness information.

Like our academic programs, content provided through our strategic partners provides the “Berkeley Difference” — evidence-based health and wellness information that can help prevent disease and improve the health of the community.However, as the authors noted in that meta-analysis, much of the prior literature was limited by the lack of a robust control group, leaving open the possibility that estimates could be biased by confounding factors, and by limited sites, sample sizes and outcome measures.To help improve the evidence on wellness programs, Song and Baicker decided to implement a large-scale controlled experiment.The UC Berkeley School of Public Health’s Health & Wellness Publications offer a positive and actionable approach to a long, healthful life.Our experts carefully examine the latest health and wellness information so readers can make quality lifestyle choices and self-care decisions.If you would like to present, start by submitting a proposal.You will need the following: presentation type, short/long descriptions, keywords, focus, themes, and biographical information.Worksites offering a wellness program had an 8.3 percentage point higher rate of employees who reported engaging in regular exercise and a 13.6 percentage point higher rate of employees who reported actively managing their weight, compared to those working at sites where a program wasn’t offered.The program had no significant effects on other outcomes including 27 self-reported health and behavioral measures such as employees’ overall health, sleep quality and food choices; 10 clinical markers of health; 38 measures tracking spending and utilization for doctor’s visits, medical tests, procedures and prescription drugs; and three employment outcomes—absenteeism, job tenure and job performance.Employees working at sites offering the program did not have better clinical measures of health such as body mass index, blood pressure or cholesterol after 18 months, nor did they exhibit lower absenteeism, better job performance or lower health care use or spending.“Our findings show that health behaviors can respond to a workplace wellness program, but they also temper expectations of realizing large returns on investment in the short term,” said study author Zirui Song, Song and study co-author Katherine Baicker, who was on faculty at Harvard at the time of the work reported in the study and now dean of the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy, said the ultimate goal of the team’s analysis is to provide scientific evidence to inform policy and ensure that decisions and investments are based on rigorous science instead of on studies that point to links and associations or on assumptions.“We wanted to explore the causal effects of workplace wellness programs using the rigorous methods of an experimental design in order to help policymakers and employers make informed decisions about investing in wellness,” Song said.

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