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They are reliable sources of validation that tell us when someone likes something we’ve posted.

And we know there is always something new to look at.

Compared to adults, kids also have a less developed ability to control their impulses.

If it’s sometimes hard for their parents to unplug, imagine how hard it is for a child who struggles with impulsivity or a teen with a new BFF to resist checking her phone.

Even if we haven’t heard the buzz alerting us to something new, we might find ourselves restlessly reaching for the phone to scroll through the constantly updating feeds full of pictures and headlines and jokes curated just for us. But there are also some less-obvious reasons why kids may be particularly hooked.

Phones are where young people do a lot of their socializing now, especially as they reach the pre-teen and teenage years, when their major developmental goals are to start crafting an identity separate from their parents and to prioritize forming friendships with their peers — goals that are made for spending hours on social media.In the study, undergraduates asked to leave their phones in another room did better on cognitive tests than those who were asked to silence their phones and leave them face down on their desk or in a bag.In the experiment, even students who said they weren’t thinking consciously about their cell phones still experienced a loss in ability, which means some of this distraction is happening on an unconscious level.It’s something almost all kids do, and most parents have also been known to check their text messages at their desk.If we’re being honest, most of us have our cell phone within arm’s reach when we’re at work, and we will glance at it from time to time.sat down with Bempechat and Erin Bruce (Wheelock’17,’18), a new fourth-grade teacher at a suburban Boston school, and future teacher freshman Emma Ardizzone (Wheelock) to talk about what quality homework looks like, how it can help children learn, and how schools can equip teachers to design it, evaluate it, and facilitate parents’ role in it.Parents and educators who are against homework in elementary school say there is no research definitively linking it to academic performance for kids in the early grades. Bempechat: I think teachers assign homework in elementary school as a way to help kids develop skills they’ll need when they’re older—to begin to instill a sense of responsibility and to learn planning and organizational skills. We (Oath) and our partners need your consent to access your device, set cookies, and use your data, including your location, to understand your interests, provide relevant ads and measure their effectiveness.Oath will also provide relevant ads to you on our partners' products.Tip: Sign In to save these choices and avoid repeating this across devices.You can always update your preferences in the Privacy Centre.

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