Research Proposal On Domestic Violence

Research Proposal On Domestic Violence-22
Eighty-three percent of respondents to the IWPR survey reported that their abusive partners disrupted their ability to work.Among those who reported experiencing one or more disruptions, 70 percent said they were not able to have a job when they wanted or needed one, and 53 percent said they lost a job because of the abuse.

Eighty-three percent of respondents to the IWPR survey reported that their abusive partners disrupted their ability to work.Among those who reported experiencing one or more disruptions, 70 percent said they were not able to have a job when they wanted or needed one, and 53 percent said they lost a job because of the abuse.

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This report examines the educational, career, and economic effects of intimate partner violence by presenting findings from a survey of 164 survivors developed by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) and administered at transitional housing programs, shelters, and other domestic violence programs in 11 states and the District of Columbia.

Though not representative of all survivors, the survey explores the self-reported effects of abuse on survivors in the sample and the resources they find most helpful in addressing the economic effects of intimate partner violence.

• Four in ten survivors said they had a partner who tried to get them pregnant against their will or stopped them from using birth control.

Among these survivors, 84 percent became pregnant as a result.

In addition to these direct costs, survivors experience other effects from IPV that can harm them financially and make it difficult to build economic security, such as lost educational opportunities, diminished ability to work, and loss of control over the choice and timing of childbearing.

Understanding the multiple effects of abuse and how they interrelate and shape survivors’ ongoing opportunities is critical to developing programs and policies that increase safety and economic security.

Twenty-two percent of those who experienced property theft or destruction estimated the value of this property to be more than ,000.

• Fifty-nine percent of respondents said they had an abusive partner who harmed their credit score in one or ways, such as not paying bills or paying them late, taking out more credit, maintaining high credit card balances, or defaulting on a loan.

Respondents identified multiple forms of help that they would benefit from moving forward, especially assistance with meeting basic needs such as food, clothing, or housing.

Respondents expressed different visions for their future, which generally emphasized the common themes of economic independence and personal safety.

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